When they gather together for their meeting on Monday, April 5, the Superior School Board will see two firsts (at least for a while):  The meeting will be held in-person and in a new location.  The in-person meeting situation marks the first time that the school board has not been virtual since the COVID-19 Pandemic began last year.

The two moves come from action taken at the school boards meeting in March.  During that meeting, they voted to resume in-person meetings again - starting with the April meeting - due to "the current community transmission rates".  According to details released by the Superior Telegram, the move was an effort to make the meetings more transparent and open to all.  According to a consensus of Superior School Board members, "It’s easier for residents to come and ask questions when the meetings are in person".

In the past, in-person meetings for the board were held at the administration building. For the time being, the meetings will be held at the Superior Senior High School Building - in the Performing Arts Center - in order to allow for social-distancing and spacing.

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At the same time that the meetings are being brought back to an in-person style, the livestreaming will conclude.  The Superior Telegram explains that "[t]he district does not have the capability [and capacity[ to record meetings at the Performing Arts Center". This will also mean that archived recordings of the meeting will no longer occur.  Superior School District Administrator Amy Starzecki suggested that both of these elements could be added back into the availability-mix after the meetings return back to the boardroom.  As far as a timeline, it was suggested that this could occur as early as this upcoming fall.

The next meeting of the Superior School Board - held in-person at the Performing Arts Center - will happen Monday, April 5 at 5:00 PM.

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