Parents - if you know, you know.  There is perhaps no greater pain that the barefoot sole of a foot meeting that un-anticipated Lego brick that was left errantly on the floor of the living room.  And while you grin and bear it while the kids are little - there comes a time when they grow older and now you're also stuck with a box (or boxes) full of the colorful toy bricks.

Throwing them away is a shame.  You could try to sell them, but often the profit margin on a garage sale is pretty slim.  So, what do you do with ole, no-longer needed Lego bricks?

It seems like the Lego company has an answer for that - and one that helps to charitably give back to children who could use them.  It's called Lego Replay and with it the Lego Group aims to "accept any and all previously used Lego bricks and donate them to children's non-profits in the United States".

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Here's how it works.  You go through your house, collecting all of the old, no longer needed, unused Lego bricks you can find; the bricks can be individual or part of a set, you can even include the set elements or attachments.  Put the Lego stuff into a cardboard box and then go to lego.com/replay to print out a free UPS shipping label.

Once you place the properly-labeled box into the UPS system, it'll be delivered to the Give Back Box facility (one of the programs partners) where "each brick will ne sorted, inspected by hand, and given a rigorous cleaning". The Lego Group explains that the ability to clean the bricks and reuse them is due to the "high-quality, durable materials" the company uses which are "designed to be used for generations".

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The Lego Replay program is a collaborative effort; the Lego Group has partnered with Give Back Box, Teach for America, and Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston to make it happen nationwide.

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