In a world of misinformation, "fake news", or "versions of the truth", how do you know what to believe? Enter Sharon McMahon.

Sharon McMahon used to be a government teacher, but has become famous by disseminating the information so people can understand it without any bias. The Duluth News Tribune is reporting she was recognized as PR Week's Communicator of the Year at its 2022 awards ceremony.

It's a yearly award that goes to a person who does an exceptional job of communicating an important message. Which is what is put out there to the public and sometimes hard to understand. According to the DNT, other recipients include Feeding America CEO Claire Babineaux-Fontenot, Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps, #MeToo movement founder Tarana Burke and Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai Malik.

PR Week reports that she uses her Instagram page and her podcast to further explain current events, governments terms, and many other things, which she says isn't always easy. She uses her knowledge of government and explains it in plain language.

The DNT says McMahon, a former teacher,  uses her Instagram @sharonsaysso and millions of downloads on her Sharon Says So podcast, her website, and some workshops she offers. She says her goal isn't to influence, it's simply to inform.

I wrote an article about how Sharon McMahon made it on The Daily Show  in 2021 and a whole new group of people discovered her. She told Trevor Noah, "My goal is never to get people to think like I think," she went on to say "My goal is to provide you with fact-based, nonpartisan information, so you can form your own educated opinions."

McMahon won the award and according to the DNT she said the black-tie event, was know as Oscars of the public relations industry, was "not a little hometown production." Her Communicator of the Year award can be compared to the Oscars' Lifetime Achievement Award which is big in her industry.

Provided by Sharon McMahon sharonmcmahom.com
Provided by Sharon McMahon sharonmcmahom.com
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PR Week's Editorial Director Steve Barrett said of Sharon McMahon that she is "someone who upholds the values of fact-based nonpartisan information at a time when this has never been more needed, and we need more of this as we emerge from a torrid time, and business and brands can also play a part in restoring civil discourse to a febrile and fractured society."

McMahon told the DNT that when she accepted the award, she was able to get in a joke about her Minnesota accent. In her speech, McMahon encouraged other communicators with power of persuasion in attendance to stop dividing America and use their power to unite.

Provided by Sharon McMahon sharonmcmahom.com
Provided by Sharon McMahon sharonmcmahom.com
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I know why she appeared on The Daily Show, I have watched it a handful of times and he seems to be able to swim through the disinformation and make fun of the people that say it by showing how stupid they think Americans are. Then he gives the real story for us to decide what to do with it what we want. Sharon for her part explains the information for the same reasons.

Here's a little of what Sharon does, in a report by KARE 11

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