The current school year has just ended and many students and parents haven't even started thinking about what they'll do for the summer; for most, the next school year (the one that starts this fall) is the farthest thing from their minds.  But, local medical experts suggest some advance thought and prep work during the summer months for the school year that's to come.

Summer is the perfect time to get students in for a school or sports-related physical.  Many schools require a complete physical to be on file in order for students to attend; additionally, many students are involved in sports or extra-curricular activities that also require a filed sports-physical in order for them to participate.

Scheduling those necessary physicals during the summer months when the kids are out of school is a great way to beat the rush and the hectic family schedules that the normal school year brings. In addition, the flexibility that summer schedules provides allows parents and families the chance to schedule back-to-back appointments so that they can take care of the whole family with one trip to the clinic.

St. Luke's - one of the primary health facilities in the Twin Ports - is reminding parents to "Be Ahead Of The Game" with their families health care and physicals.  They have the staffing ready to meet those scheduled appointments and they can also combine visits to get students and children the vaccines they need - including ones for HPV and COVID-19. At St. Luke's, Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine is available for kids 12 years of age and older.

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The goal from the school to the health facility (and the parents) is to keep kids healthy.  Dr. Amanda Webb, a St. Luke's Pediatric Associate offers:

"Keeping kids healthy and active is one of our top priorities.  Having kids get their immunizations and sports physicals ensures that they are at their best - both on and off the field."

According to details released by St. Luke's, the goal of any sports-related physical is to "identify and address an potential health issues a student athlete may have so that they can safely participate in their sport."  So what can a student or their parent expect at a sports or school-physical?  Usually they're comprised of two parts:  a review of the patients medical history and a physical exam.

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