As the summer winds down, many Northland gardeners start to look ahead to the fall harvest.  Let's face it - no matter how much you're using those vegetables on the dinner table in July and August, the end of the season will mean you'll have to get them out of the ground.

That fall harvest often overwhelms gardeners.  Suddenly, the slow trickle of fresh produce they'e enjoyed all summer long is replaced with boxes, bowls, and tables full of vegetables that need to be preserved in some form or fashion in order make sure they don't go to waste.

Sure - you can freeze some of them; many vegetables hold up well to being frozen, without losing taste, quality, or texture.  But others don't freeze well - and that presents a problem.

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An age old solution - and one that's coming back into popularity - is home canning.  Many people are thrown off by canning thinking that it's a difficult process.  It isn't, but you do need to follow instructions carefully to make sure that the food you pack into those jars is safe and edible.

Here are some vegetables that Northlanders tend to grow that do well in canning jars: