It's just another February in the Twin Ports. A big snowstorm has hit the state and is already causing major issues, including school closures and travel advisories. The storm is expected to bring frigid wind chills and tons of snow to the Northland, with totals varying depending on location.

With all of these factors at play, it isn't a shock that the weather is also impacting airline travel. The Duluth International Airport shared an update on Wednesday afternoon (February 22nd), writing that there were flight delays out of the airport.

If you are a Minnesotan, you likely already know the deal by now but they shared more details for good measure. They advise anyone who is planning to travel over the next few days to check their flight status to make sure it is still on time or happening at all .

They also suggest contacting your airline before you arrive to the Duluth International Airport, as your flight may be pushed back or you may need to make a different airline reservation. The two airlines that are impacted out of the Duluth International Airport are Delta and United.

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The Duluth International Airport provided links for each airline so customers can easily check their flight status and see if a flight is cancelled or delayed due to this winter storm.

As of Wednesday night, the following flights are cancelled out of the Duluth International Airport:

  • Delta flight DL3956 to Minneapolis / MSP
  • Delta flight DL1260 to Phoenix

There are no flight cancellations at the time of writing for Thursday (February 23rd) or Friday (February 24th). However, things can change as the winter storm progresses so make sure to call your airline or check online before headed to the Duluth International Airport.

Things are already getting hairy as of Wednesday night, with MnDot issuing "no travel advisories" for several counties. There are already several winter weather alerts in effect and the potential for flooding.

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