The Minnesota Department of Transportation works on countless projects throughout every year and MnDOT crews probably have many stories to tell about a variety of things they encounter during just about every one. At some point, they likely feel like they've seen everything.

However, crews recently discovered a very unique situation while working to repaint a Minnesota bridge, which they happened to capture on video.

They shared their October discovery, as well as what was ultimately done with their new friends, December 22 on the Minnesota Department of Transportation Facebook page:

It’s not uncommon for MnDOT staff to encounter animals during the course of their field work. This happened recently when crews repainting the Wabasha-Nelson Bridge in southeast Minnesota found five baby barn owls nested inside the steel structure.
After discovering the owls, crews modified a protective containment area near the nest so the adults could still fly in and the fledglings could fly out. The project team also changed plans so work in the area of the nest would be completed later after the birds were gone.

Get our free mobile app
It appears from the video below that they were very content with their location and they didn't mind having company.

The baby owls were discovered on October 5 and MnDOT says they were within several days from flying out and away. They're also happy to report that all the cute little baby birds survived and they all flew safely away by October 15.

How cool that the Minnesota Department Of Transportation crew went out of their way a bit to ensure the safety of the owls. While it may have delayed the painting job slightly, it was totally worth it.

LOOK: Stunning animal photos from around the world

From grazing Tibetan antelope to migrating monarch butterflies, these 50 photos of wildlife around the world capture the staggering grace of the animal kingdom. The forthcoming gallery runs sequentially from air to land to water, and focuses on birds, land mammals, aquatic life, and insects as they work in pairs or groups, or sometimes all on their own.
Get our free mobile app

LOOK: 30 fascinating facts about sleep in the animal kingdom

More From KOOL 101.7