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Now was the time for Eric Clapton to record some new music. He was clean, and felt better than he had in years. After meeting with his manager, it was decided recording an album in Florida would be the next project.

Having recently been through rehab, and a long self imposed exile, Eric seemed to be  having some difficulty in the recording studio. He felt perhaps the album should be delayed until he got his wings back so to speak.  His manager disagreed and sent in reinforcements to help him, among them, George Terry, and Yvonne Elliman (she  would go on to record "If I Can't Have You in 1978).

They suggested that something by Bob Marley might be cool, and felt "I Shot The Sheriff" would be perfect for Eric. Clapton didn't think so however, he felt he couldn't do the song justice. Remember, Clapton is a "purist" at heart, and he was not about to record something if he felt unsure about it. After much persuading, ( and to keep the peace), Clapton gave it a go and the boys recorded it. When he heard the playback, he felt more certain than ever it wasn't for him. It just didn't "feel" or "sound" right" to him. Those in the studio with him disagreed, and to a person, swore it  would be a hit.

Completion of the album "461 Ocean Boulevard" (his residence at the time) was near, and again Eric asked that  "I Shot The Sheriff" be omitted from the album. Management, as well as each who had worked on the album felt it should  be included, and Clapton was overridden. When the album was released, the record company chose to release "I Shot The Sheriff" as a single, and to Clapton's astonishment, it went right to number one.  On this day in 1975, he received a gold record for the song he thought he couldn't do justice to.